C# Properties

C# Properites doesn't have storage location. C# Properites are extension of fields and accessed like fields.

The Properties have accessors that are used to set, get or compute their values.

Usage of C# Properties

  1. C# Properties can be read-only or write-only.
  2. We can have logic while setting values in the C# Properties.
  3. We make fields of the class private, so that fields can't be accessed from outside the class directly. Now we are forced to use C# properties for setting or getting values.

C# Properties Example

snippet
using System;
   public class Employee
    {
        private string name;

        public string Name
        {
            get
            {
                return name;
            }
            set
            {
                name = value;
            }
        }
   }
   class TestEmployee{
       public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Employee e1 = new Employee();
            e1.Name = "Sonoo Jaiswal";
            Console.WriteLine("Employee Name: " + e1.Name);

        }
    }

Output:

Output
Employee Name: Sonoo Jaiswal

C# Properties Example 2: having logic while setting value

snippet
using System;
   public class Employee
    {
        private string name;

        public string Name
        {
            get
            {
                return name;
            }
            set
            {
                name = value+" JavaTpoint";
                
            }
        }
   }
   class TestEmployee{
       public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Employee e1 = new Employee();
            e1.Name = "Sonoo";
            Console.WriteLine("Employee Name: " + e1.Name);
        }
    }

Output:

Output
Employee Name: Sonoo JavaTpoint

C# Properties Example 3: read-only property

snippet
using System;
   public class Employee
    {
        private static int counter;

        public Employee()
        {
            counter++;
        }
        public static int Counter
        {
            get
            {
                return counter;
            }
         }
   }
   class TestEmployee{
       public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Employee e1 = new Employee();
            Employee e2 = new Employee();
            Employee e3 = new Employee();
            //e1.Counter = 10;//Compile Time Error: Can't set value

            Console.WriteLine("No. of Employees: " + Employee.Counter);
        }
    }

Output:

Output
No. of Employees: 3
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